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Thursday, November 5, 2020

New Zealand |Travel and Places to Visit

In a land area, slightly larger than the UK, New Zealand's places to visit are as diverse as they are amazing. The country has become one of the most fascinating dropbox for enthusiast travelers and nature lovers.

From the Bay of Islands, pristine beaches in the north to the rising islands of Milford Sound in the south, New Zealand has lots of strange and wonderful places to visit. This small, remote and thinly populated corner of the world is well stocked above its weight with its outdoor scenery, spectacular festivals, sumptuous food and wine, Maori culture, and magical outdoor experiences. While most visitors are attracted to New Zealand by its natural splendor, the country has a wide spectrum of land and city escapes.

New Zealand offers so much to see and it can be a challenge to do it all in one holiday. Mix city landmarks with off-the-beaten-path adventures; Sample local food, mingle with the locals, and most importantly, enjoy the unique experiences you take by traveling through one of the world's most exciting tourist destinations. To help get you started, here is the list of the top ten places to visit in New Zealand.

10. Abel Tasman National Park

Abel Tasman National Park may be New Zealand's smallest national park, but it is made up for its size with its immense beauty. Covered in lush green hills and surrounded by golden sandy coves that slowly slip into warm shallows that warm before meeting the crystal-clear sea of ​​Cerulean Blue, Abel Tasman National Park is the quintessential postcard paradise. Here you can do any type of outdoor activities such as tramping, kayaking, and swimming or just sunbathing on the beach. Wildlife sighting is another popular pastime here - many seabirds nest in the park, often escaping from the eyes of seals or the occasional dolphin.
Location: South Island

Abel Tasman National Park

9. Tongariro National Park

Established in 1887, Tongariro National Park is New Zealand's first and fourth national park in the world and one of New Zealand's three major heritage sites. Its three massive, active volcanoes originate from a huge, scrub-covered alpine plateau, making it one of the most spectacular locations in the country. Tongariro is the North Island's best ski location/spot and home to the nation's best single-day wilderness walk, the Tongariro Alpine Crossing which offers the perfect taste for what the park has to offer. The long Tongiaro northern circuit, spent with volcanic craters and lakes, can be taken over by those over time. No lover of the great road should miss this ancient land.
Location: North Island

Tongariro National Park

8. Waitomo

Enticing tourists for over 100 years, Waitomo is a must-see for its surrealist underground landscapes, a stunning maze of underground caves, valleys, and rivers that destroy the northern Qing country limestone. While Waitomo is most famous for its extensive cave systems, it has gained a reputation as the adventure capital of the North Island in recent years. Black-water rafting is the big greed here (like white-water rafting but through a dark cave), as well as underground abseiling, glowworm gratos, and more stalactites and stalagmites than you will ever see in one place. There are plenty of opportunities for underground walking, either a dry walking tour or a wet, adrenaline-charged sub-terranean adventure.
Location: North Island

Waitomo Cave New Zealnad

7. Franz Josef and Fox Glacier

Amongst more than 60 glaciers in World Heritage Westland National Park, Franz Josef, and Fox's spectacular glaciers are most notable for several reasons, including accumulation and descent rates, and their proximity to both the highest peaks of the Southern Alps and the Tasman Sea around 10 km away. Several short walkways towards the fragmented faces of the glaciers or you can take a guided hike on the snow. Glaciers are melting at an accelerated pace, so watch them before they leave.
Location: South Island

Franz Josef and Fox Glacier

6. Auckland

Most international visitors drop down in Auckland, but the city has become more than just a getaway to the rest of the country. Auckland has always offered amazing scenery but recently this vibrant, exciting city has turned into a world-class tourist destination. With its stunning beaches, beautiful parks and gardens, and a variety of restaurants and nightlife, Auckland has a mix of attractions for both outdoor enthusiasts and indoor lovers. While the island-built Hauraki Bay is Auckland's aquatic playground, and Rangitito is an icon of the city, where it has the perfect volcanic cone, it is Waiheke, with its beautiful beaches, acclaimed wineries and upmarket eateries that make up Auckland's most popular is the island.
Location: North Island

Auckland New Zealand

5. Milford Sound (Start from here)

A 16-kilometer long forward, Milford Sound is one of New Zealand's most famous attractions, popular for its raw beauty, grandeur, and accessibility (by road, air, or by walking on the Milford Track). The Millers greatly surpassed you to see the milling sound on a clear, sunny day. This is why when waterlogging, waterlogged rocks and peaks collapse, and deep cobalt water is at its best in the world. More likely, the classic Fiordland combination of mist and drizzle, with iconic profiles of the Mitre Peak, is revealed through gently shimmering sheets of rain. Dolphins, fur seals, an occasional foreland cradled penguin, crayfishing boats, and camper share the deep dark waters of the launch sound, but you never lose the feeling of being the lowest in the world.
Location: South Island

Milford Sound

4. Rotorua

Located 200 km (124 mi) south of Auckland, the thermally active Rotorua is one of New Zealand's exceptional regions not to be missed. The first thing you will notice about Rotorua is the foul smell but once you find the smell, Rotorua will amaze you. Originally a wild and marshy wasteland with steaming pools and mud holes, today it is these volcanic byproducts that everyone is here to see: geysers, bubbling mud, ground cracks, steam, and minerals containing Boiling pools of water. Rotorua is one of the best places in New Zealand to the first experience. The cost of visiting the major attractions will go up, but some natural attractions are free and despite year-round crowds, the unpredictable and volatile atmosphere seems to be seeping from under your feet, isolating Rotorua.
Location: North Island

Rotorua

3. Kaikoura

Known as the crayfish capital of New Zealand, Kaikoura has grown rapidly in recent years from a small fishing village to one of the country's major wildlife sites. The highlight is the proximity to sperm whales, which feed within a kilometer (0.6 mi) of the coast, but there are plenty of other opportunities to interact with nature if you have the time (and cash) - whales, dolphins, New Zealand Fur seals, penguins, shears, petrels and wandering albatross all close the area or make it as their home. Wildlife on one side, the setting is nothing short of stunning, with the city facing the flaring blue Pacific Ocean on one side and the steep mountains of the Kaikoura Range as a backdrop.
Location: South Island

Kaikoura

2. Bay of Islands

Located 257 km (160 mi) north of Auckland, the Bay of Islands is one of New Zealand's most beautiful and historic regions. Since its discovery by Captain James Cook in the 18th century, its tranquil cove, soft sandy beaches, spectacular waters, and the twigs of Pohutukawa trees have attracted tourists from all over the world. Beautiful rays in turquoise waters, foraging of dolphins at the tip of boats, and gliding gracefully to the pod of orcas are just some of the images you can see while on vacation in the Bay of Islands. From diving to micro-islands to kayaking or sailing, there are innumerable options to lure you on the water to explore this beautiful bay of 144 islands.
Location: North Island

Bay of Islands

1. Queenstown

Located on the shores of Glacial Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown is the most popular tourist destination in the South Island, with stunning views of the sawtooth Peaks of the Remarkables mountain range. Queenstown has become the adventurous capital of New Zealand, with mountains, lakes, and rivers ready for it. While Queenstown may be known as the birthplace of Bungy jumps, a bridge connected to a giant rubber band owes more to the adventure center of New Zealand than to leap. Travelers can spend the day skiing, hiking, or mountain biking before dining at a cosmopolitan restaurant or partying at some of New Zealand's best bars. Next-day options include hand-gliding, kayaking, or river rafting, or a detour to Arrowtown or Glerochery.
Location: South Island

Queenstown

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